Dad's Rallisport Car

A YouTube commenter stole the show when he found his late father’s “ghost” in an old Xbox game.

And warning: someone is cutting all the onions right now. All of them. It’s dusty, I have allergies, and all of the onions are cut.

There’s a great digital series called PBS Game/Show (yeah dude, PBS), that you should be watching. It’s hosted by Jamin Warren and he hammers through topics like sex in video games, humor in video games and whether video games can give you spiritual experiences.

The latter topic is where our story starts. You can watch the May 22 episode (at the bottom of this article), but what overshadowed the whole episode was a commenter by the name of 00WARTHERAPY00, who stole the show with this comment:

Well, when i was 4, my dad bought a trusty XBox. you know, the first, ruggedy, blocky one from 2001. we had tons and tons and tons of fun playing all kinds of games together – until he died, when i was just 6.

i couldnt touch that console for 10 years.

but once i did, i noticed something.

we used to play a racing game, Rally Sports Challenge. actually pretty awesome for the time it came.

and once i started meddling around… i found a GHOST.

literaly.

you know, when a time race happens, that the fastest lap so far gets recorded as a ghost driver? yep, you guessed it – his ghost still rolls around the track today.

and so i played and played, and played, untill i was almost able to beat the ghost. until one day i got ahead of it, i surpassed it, and…~

i stopped right in front of the finish line, just to ensure i wouldnt delete it.
Bliss.

Onions, someone’s cutting all the onions.

There’s no question as to why this story absolutely stole everyone’s hearts. As we enter this digital age, more of this is bound to happen; parents that die now have digital footprints, and they will emerge in the most odd places – with Facebook requests to wish them a “happy birthday”, with warnings that an idle account you’d set up for them will expire soon, or even with ghost data that still exists in an old console game.

These are digital times, and we’re getting heavy with our new digital experiences.

And just because you should totally watch it, here’s the PBS Game/Show episode about spiritual experiences in games:

Thanks to Canadian Dad Chris Read for pointing me to this story!